0 In Field Notes

Kayaking Noosa Everglades

Only a couple of days paddling (or a short drive) away from tourism hub Noosa lies a beautifully lush maze of wetlands known as the Noosa Everglades. Since large portions are only accessible via man-powered vessels it is the perfect place to escape from the tourist hordes of the Australian East Coast and enjoy the beautiful scenery without the disturbance of loud motorboats.

Sounding pretty good? Have a look out our field notes to help you prep for your own trip kayaking Noosa Everglades.

KAYAKING NOOSA EVERGLADES – THE STATS

Distance: Boreen Point to Campsite 15 = 30km

Camp permits: Essential! Book here.

Best time to go: Year round, but winter and early spring are the driest and quietest times (go figure!).

Kayak rentals: These guys rent out sit-in kayaks (great for longer trips) for up to a week and are very affordable.

Map: Download and one here

Skill level: Any

KAYAKING NOOSA EVERGLADES – DESCRIPTION

Sourcing from Cooloola NP, the Noosa River is a red stained waterway which meets several lakes on its way to merger with the ocean in the town of Noosa. In some shallow parts of the river, where the bottom consists of crisp white sand, the tea tree tainted waters become so vibrantly red that… well… we’ll just leave it up to your imagination as to what illusion it creates.

If you have a look at a map of the Noosa River. Finding the entrance to the Everglades may look like it could be a bit of a challenge. We promise though it is easy as pie! On Lake Cootharaba, stay on the western side and head towards the Information Center. Which is a big and brown building, plus the only one that close to the entrance. You can’t miss it! From there on, the way to Harry’s Hut (an old logging station turned old mate Harry’s holiday shack turned historic site) is signed like roads on the water.

kayaking noosa everglades
kayaking noosa everglades
kayaking noosa everglades

Pay attention however if you decide to explore Lake Como! Locals tell us it can be hard to find your way back through the reeds. So keep an eye on your entry point or drop a mark on your GPS before heading out on the Lake.

On your way to Harry’s Hut. keep an ear out for the tour boat (a small ferry which won’t go past the historic site) and any motorized dinghies (which won’t go past campsite 3) sneaking up on you.

KAYAKING NOOSA EVERGLADES – ACCESSIBILITY

With towns, large and tiny, along the southern end of the Noosa River, the everglades are easily accessible. Both Noosa and slightly more northern Tewantin have many launching possibilties and places to leave your car. However, campsites along this southern stretch of the river are scarce and often overcrowded and you might encounter quite a few day trippers. Keen to skip the urbanized part and head straight for the sanctuary of the engine free (and tourist free) zone? Launch from Boreen Point campsite like we did. As an added bonus, this tiny slightly sleepy town seemed like a lot more of a reassuring place to leave our car.

KAYAKING NOOSA EVERGLADES – CAMPSITES

There are 15 campsites along the Noosa River. The first 3 campsites are open to motorized vessels and have small jetties to tie your boat off to. These campsites are also accessible through hiking tracks, so you may have the occasional guest drop by. Past campsite 3, motorized boats are no longer allowed and none of the campsites have any facilities (make sure to bring a trowel and plenty water). This blissful combination ensure that the crowds stay away and any people you encounter are like-minded wandering adventurers such as yourself.

kayaking noosa everglades
kayaking noosa everglades

Booking of campsites is essential and can be done through here. The number of people per campsite varies, but all take only one group. This means that if you book a say 15 person site just for you, no one else can book it and you’ll have it all for yourself (whoop whoop!).

KAYAKING NOOSA EVERGLADES – THE ROUNDUP
kayaking noosa everglades

All and all, we reckon any paddler from any level will enjoy a trip kayaking Noosa Everglades. The lakes can get quite choppy when the wind picks up, which can be a bit too challenging for beginner paddlers. Make sure you have light winds on you lake crossing! The Everglades themselves are very protected and narrow, making them very suitable for a first overnight trip.

For advanced kayakers, kayaking Noosa Everglades is a relaxing and easy trip with epic scenes that won’t disappoint!

kayaking noosa everglades
kayaking noosa everglades

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